Finding our marbles

This is an unpublished essay I wrote in the wake of the first Covid-19 lockdown, at a time when most sport events had been abruptly cancelled. In the essay, I explore one peculiar sport (or sport-like) phenomenon that rose dramatically in popularity as a result: marble racing. Because marble racing recreates the aesthetics of sport with HD clarity, it can serve as an occasion to reconsider what sport is, how sport tells stories, and what those stories might mean for us at this strange historical juncture.

“Finding our marbles: How a YouTube phenomenon can help us rethink sport.” Available at: https://sophushelle.com/2020/08/21/finding-our-marbles/. Written in August 2020, uploaded in April 2021.

Love in our time

Disney films over the past ten years have witnessed a remarkable shift, as the ideal of romantic love has been replaced by an ideal of family love. The essay traces the cultural and political ramifications of this shift, to show the importance and potential of studying the history of emotions. It is included as a model essay in the 10th edition of the Norton Sampler.

“Love isn’t what it was: How Disney took to subverting its own romantic ideals,” Aeon (June 2019). Link.

From beast to man

A new fragment of Gilgamesh, published in 2018, expanded our knowledge about how Enkidu was transformed from animal to human. The fragment showed that Babylonians imagined the process of becoming human as a gradual integration into the community of the city.

“Between gods and animals: becoming human in the Gilgamesh epic,” Aeon (February 2019). Link.

Omens in marble

The Babylonian divinatory series Shumma alu inspired the Danish poet Morten Søndergaard to create a massive installation piece, where he inscribed omen-like sentences in a marble floor. The essay discusses whether unconventional outreach formats such as this can help academics reach new audiences.

“In popular culture: Shumma Alu in Denmark,” Mar Shiprim (September 2017). Link.